H. E. Knowlton

Associate Professor
785-864-4954
Joseph R. Pearson Hall

Earle Knowlton is an Associate Professor in the Department of Special Education, specializing in human-computer interaction as it pertains to teacher quality and development. He is also Principal Investigator for the Social Tele-Coaching Project, a 3-year research grant funded by the Institute of Education Sciences, that is examining the viability and potency of remote, covert coaching of students with emotional and behavior disorders who are learning the general education curriculum in general education classrooms. He also is involved in graduate/professional training of special educators who work with students with low-incidence disabilities and behavioral issues. His efforts in this area include the study of augmented-reality simulation training's effects on the acquisition and generalization of scientifically valid teaching techniques. Dr. Knowlton has been a department faculty member for 34 years, having received an Ed.D. in special education from the University of Kentucky. He has also been a teacher in both general and special education.

Research

Simulation Training

Academic Degrees

  • Ed.D, Special Education - Learning Behavior Disorders, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, 1978
  • M. Ed., Special Education, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, 1973
  • B.S., Elementary Education, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1972

Specializations

Research on and development of technological tools and innovations in the preparation of teachers and roles of computer and telecommunications technology in cognition and learning.


Kansas Teacher Service Scholarship

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Special Education Events
Meet Dr. Kristin Joannou Lyon! Congratulations on your dissertation defense!

Read new highlight by Jenny Kurth http://t.co/HuJdo6DdFd


#1 public program in nation for special education
—U.S. News & World Report
2nd nationwide for most published journal articles in special education
Wayne Sailor directs KU’s largest grant, the $24.5 million SWIFT project, to develop a national center to assist schools
A $2.5 million grant will fund research on reasons effective technology tools are underused for students with disabilities